Posts filed under ‘Economic Development’

Discovery Place eyeing Belmont for children’s museum

Even though the concept is old news ’round here, when the Gazette picks it up, it must be important.

We think this is a great reuse of the inactive mills, it helps from a destination place viewpoint, and it keeps the Discovery Place program in the forefront of children’s programming.

Our wholehearted endorsement of this program is just a few small voices applauding the formation and planning process.

With homes in the former Chronicle Mill village converted to private ownership, and the lack of significant parking, what are the plans to move cars, and the many school busses and day care busses through the neighborhood?

This will certainly be a challenge to Mayor Richard Boyce’s vision of “Neighborhood Preservation’ as expressed in the recently passed Comprehensive Land Use Plan.

We would assume the RL Stowe Fiber Lab will be eliminated for the parking needs, but that begs the question about the Belmont Parks and Rec department onetime eye on the land next to the new police station. Members of council had shared an interest several years ago in this land for a Recreation Center when the police station was under construction. Now that the Parks Bond has passed, maybe they have backed off on that idea?

The program of regionalizing the Discovery Place for children in the lower elementary grades is a workable concept. Already in the design phase, a similar regional Discovery Place Kids will be located in Huntersville. As many as five regional prgrams could be established. Kinda wonder what would happen to the Schiele Museum over in Gastonia. The city’s museum is struggling financially and the current city manager has put pressure on all the department heads to lower city-funded operating losses.

Could Discovery Place Kids be the Wal-mart of children’s museum programming?

Good Luck with this project, we hope it works out for the best for everyone.

 

June 2, 2008 at 11:04 pm Leave a comment

Blowing (in) with the Wind: Myrick legislative works

US Representative, Sue Myrick, has introduced legislation to open drilling activities off the North Carolina Outer Banks region. “Some may say my legislation is controversial. So be it.”

Duh.

Representative Myrick points to a recent Gallup poll that says 57% of Americans support drilling for offshore oil. Does she represent the 9th district of North Carolina or the oil barons of Texas?

Oil rigs visible from the shoreline of Hatteras, more – barely secured facilities off the US coastline, and destruction of active fishing grounds – both sport and commercial. Just a few of the results of trying to save her seat in Congress.

Pandering to the whims of an administration bent on “doing nothing”? Yet, attempting to show “independence of thought” by doing “what is right” to loosen our dependence on foreign energy supplies?

Ms. Myrick continues to Blow with the Wind – too bad she couldn’t see past her next round of election campaigns.    

May 30, 2008 at 11:01 am 2 comments

Palenick and Council Cronies to use strong arm tactics

Over in the county seat, Gastonia citizens are experiencing yet another turn from the litigious-minded city manager, Jim “Big Plan” Palenick.

 

Why not force a business to GIVE their land to the city through the eminent domain process granted to public entities? The issue is the bank building and land within “Big Plan” Palenick’s downtown renovation. The city wants the land for the “public good”, the bank wants fair market value for the property. The city says the fair market is only UP TO $600,000, the bank disagrees. Three members of city council have sided with the government – well, that’s all it takes – now it appears the citizens of Gastonia will be headed for court.

What a great use of taxpayer money! Something continues to stink in Gas-town.

 

 

May 22, 2008 at 12:12 pm Leave a comment

U.S. economy rebounds thanks to huge growth of farmers markets

WASHINGTON– In a surprising turn of events, new financial data from the Federal Reserve brought jubilation to both Main Street and Wall Street yesterday as the economic picture for job growth, new business starts and overall household income improved markedly improved since last month. But financial analysts were bewildered about the source of this sudden economic rebound: farmers markets reopening for spring with fresh produce.

“The looming economic recession that kept Americans on the edge of their seats for the past months has been entirely and unexpectedly averted by an infusion of revenue generated at local farmers markets,” said a grinning Ben Bernanke, chairman of the Federal Reserve, at an appearance with President Bush at a farmers market in suburban Reston, Virginia. “We should never have underestimated the economic prowess of public markets simply because of their small size, lack of business experience, or previously tiny share of the commodity system.

 clip_image003_0004_large.jpg George Bush and Ben Bernanke

The outlook is even rosier for April and May, as farmer’s markets reopen in many states outside the Sun Belt. Concerns were raised by many economists about what happens late next fall when local farmers markets shut down at the end of harvest season, but Congress was busy all day yesterday drafting emergency legislation to construct thousands of indoor year-round public markets.

The Clinton-McCain-Obama Act, named for its chief sponsors, passed unanimously in both the House and Senate yesterday and was signed by President Bush in a special ceremony at Washington’s Eastern Market this morning. It appropriates more than $37 billion dollars to construct and manage indoor public markets in every county seat and community of more than 2500 people across America.

“Obviously, these sources of local food, public gathering places, and intra-neighborhood commerce are the engine that will drive the economy of the United States,” Bush said as several members of the White House press corps fainted in shock.

While this marks a sudden and fundamental shift in the Bush Administration’s policy, press secretary Dana Perino reminded reporters, “George Bush and Dick Cheney have always been true believers in market economics.”

“This administration may have devoted too much attention to large businesses in our first seven years,” Perino admitted. “But in our last ten months we will do everything possible to level the playing field by boosting small-scale farmers and enterprises that serve Americans right in their communities. Farmers markets are just the beginning. We also intend to boost small, independent neighborhood businesses.”

Economic analysts attribute this huge growth in farmers markets to consumers’ newfound interest in eating locally-sourced food, improving public health, boosting their local economies, creating community gathering places and supporting small, environmentally-friendly farmers everywhere.

“We must publicly acknowledge the new power of farmers markets in the U.S., and admit that we have so far missed the boat on what consumers want: healthy, locally-grown food,” said Alice Walton, daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton. “We cannot stand in the way of progress. We plan to add organic farmers markets to each Wal-Mart store and will look into tearing up the parking lots to plant heirloom tomatoes.”

Interest in locally produced food is expected to grow substantially, fueled in part by a report to be released next week by the federal Centers for Disease Control that unearths long-buried research establishing clear links between eating locally and wildly prolonged human life expectancy.

Read this and all the other April 1 News at Faking Places. Hope your day was a pleasant one…

April 1, 2008 at 10:27 pm 1 comment

Coffee with Local Legislators – April 11

Have Coffee & Conversation With Local Legislators on April 11

Here’s your chance to ask questions of and make suggestions to your local legislators

before the N.C. General Assembly convenes in May. Sen. David Hoyle, Rep. William Current

and Rep. Wil Neumann are scheduled to participate in a Chamber Coffee & Conversation

on Friday, April 11, at Queen of The Apostles Catholic Church Family Center, 503 N. Main St., Belmont.

david-w-hoyle.jpg Hoyle   wil-neumann.jpg Neumann

bill-current.jpg  Dr. Current

Coffee and juice and a light breakfast will be provided starting at 7:30 a.m. The program will start promptly at

8 a.m. and end at 9. The cost is $5 at the door. Registration is requested by email to info@belmontchamber.com.

For more information, call 704-825-5307, or go to the Chamber website at www.belmontchamber.com.

April 1, 2008 at 1:49 pm Leave a comment

Development to reshape Cramerton

village-at-south-fork-property.jpg

The new development called Villages at South Fork  along with any earlier plan simply called Lakewood Village will bring 1,409 “upscale” housing units to the Town of Cramerton along with a combined 170,000 square feet of commercial space over the next 5 to 7 years.

lakewood-village.jpg

Of course, this development impacts the whole area, and most importantly the school system and roads.

Hold on for this ride.

March 17, 2008 at 12:38 am 4 comments

Wow ! Newcomers make another impact

See The Spectacular 33 N. Main Renovation Thursday

 rose-building-before-renovations.jpg   new-chamber-logo.jpg

What a difference in the building at 33 N. Main in Belmont from August to March!

And here’s your chance to see the renovation that owner Richard LaVecchia has achieved as the new Designing Brides and the relocated Peppermint Shoestring hold an open house and grand opening Thursday, March 13, from 10 AM until 7 PM.

rose-building-after-renovations.jpg

Nancy Lepore, owner of Designing Brides, and Lynnelle Dobbins, owner of the Peppermint Shoestring Children’s Boutique, extend a special invitation to Chamber members and friends to come by between 5 p.m and 7 p.m. for tours and refreshments.

The building, which was once used as a funeral home, a clothing store, and most recently, a gift basket shop, will be a fine addition to the thriving downtown community.

Several neighbors and friends met Nancy Lepore and her husband, Patrick, last summer during the Friday Night Alive activities.  

March 11, 2008 at 12:38 pm Leave a comment

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